TheReadingLifeisForMe

TheReadingLifeisForMe

Accept that diversity is not a zero-sum game.

This applies to readers, writers, and editors alike. We benefit from a greater variety of voices, writing, publications, venues – and this growth in the field challenges us as editors and writers to do better. (I am hoping to write more about this topic soon).

behind-the-book:

High School Reading List
Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.
Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Drown by Junot Diaz
Kindred by Octavia E. Butler
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson
Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor
The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin
The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi
Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis
A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri
The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez
A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah
Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle
Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman
The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi
For descriptions, click the read more!
(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle School lists)
Read More
behind-the-book:

High School Reading List
Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.
Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Drown by Junot Diaz
Kindred by Octavia E. Butler
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson
Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor
The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin
The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi
Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis
A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri
The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez
A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah
Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle
Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman
The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi
For descriptions, click the read more!
(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle School lists)
Read More
behind-the-book:

High School Reading List
Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.
Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Drown by Junot Diaz
Kindred by Octavia E. Butler
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson
Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor
The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin
The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi
Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis
A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri
The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez
A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah
Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle
Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman
The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi
For descriptions, click the read more!
(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle School lists)
Read More
behind-the-book:

High School Reading List
Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.
Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Drown by Junot Diaz
Kindred by Octavia E. Butler
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson
Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor
The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin
The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi
Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis
A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri
The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez
A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah
Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle
Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman
The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi
For descriptions, click the read more!
(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle School lists)
Read More

behind-the-book:

High School Reading List

Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Drown by Junot Diaz

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi

Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis

A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri

The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle

Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi

For descriptions, click the read more!

(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle School lists)

Read More

(via weneeddiversebooks)

tamorapierce:

flavorpill:

Why Does Sports Media Ignore Women? By Tom Hawking

Anyone who follows US sports in more than the most cursory manner probably has an opinion on ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith — and anyone who’s been paying attention will know that he is, as Australian basketballer Andrew Bogut put it rather succinctly a couple of months back, a wanker. Smith is a professional loudmouth, a man whose career revolves around spouting “controversial” opinions in a controversial manner. As such, it wasn’t entirely surprising to hear him make an ass of himself last week with his opinions about women provoking domestic violence, and it’s been rather heartening to see his comments beingridiculed around the Internet. What’s less heartening is the way that ESPN has refused to sanction him — the network played a taped apology yesterday, but Smith will go back to work as though nothing’s happened, at least until the next time he says something stupid.

READ MORE on Flavorwire

As the attached log implies, ESPN might attract more female viewers if they got rid of this victim-blaming asswipe.  They really ought to wake up and stick their heads out of their jockstraps.  And this snotstain really ought to pay attention to who actually gets arrested in incidents of domestic abuse.

tamorapierce:

flavorpill:

Why Does Sports Media Ignore Women? By Tom Hawking

Anyone who follows US sports in more than the most cursory manner probably has an opinion on ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith — and anyone who’s been paying attention will know that he is, as Australian basketballer Andrew Bogut put it rather succinctly a couple of months back, a wanker. Smith is a professional loudmouth, a man whose career revolves around spouting “controversial” opinions in a controversial manner. As such, it wasn’t entirely surprising to hear him make an ass of himself last week with his opinions about women provoking domestic violence, and it’s been rather heartening to see his comments beingridiculed around the Internet. What’s less heartening is the way that ESPN has refused to sanction him — the network played a taped apology yesterday, but Smith will go back to work as though nothing’s happened, at least until the next time he says something stupid.

READ MORE on Flavorwire

As the attached log implies, ESPN might attract more female viewers if they got rid of this victim-blaming asswipe.  They really ought to wake up and stick their heads out of their jockstraps.  And this snotstain really ought to pay attention to who actually gets arrested in incidents of domestic abuse.

The person I blogged this from deserves to have a great day

(via bisexualzuko)

shiny-loveliness:

protip: if a piece of writing can have the word “gay” featured all by itself but can’t say “bisexual” without adding “lesbian, gay” in front of it it’s probably not worth the time

(via bisexual-books)

At what point do you take girls out of school altogether because boys can’t handle it?

whitebeltwriter:

leslieknope-s:

[x]

This needs more notes

Please Reblog if you think it’s alright for a young girl to have short hair

thechurroprince:

Ok so my sister [shes 10] wants to cut her hair short [similar to Rhianna] and my mom says that it’s wrong and ugly for a girl to cut her hair short [ive been told that yet I cut it] And I want to show her that that’s just not how things work, That any girl can have short hair if they want and still look “girly” or “ladylike” as my mom would say

I would like to have shorter hair but then it would poof up

(via clearlyivemadesomebaddecisions)

Photo 1: The entrance to our ship. It was pretty cool and I would have taken Gladys’s photo but she was packed in my cousin’s suitcase.
When we first entered there was music playing. The first song played full through was…Blurred Lines (why couldn’t it be Word Crimes?) So the first five minutes were ruined by that sexist piece of sh*t but we quickly found sanctuary in the buffet room.
Photo 2: My lunch on Day One of the cruise.
Not very exciting.
Photo 3:
Sam’s lunch.
Sam’s Comment: It was like a regular cheese burger, nothing wrong with it. It was nice and big. The fries were good.
Photo 4: Sam and I both ate a lot of desert on the cruise and ice cream was undoubtedly our favorite.
So cold, so tasty…
Photo 5: Chocolate cake.Sam and I split a piece and I have to say I was not a fan. Everything was too dry. Including the icing! It was horrible!
As you can tell, day one on the cruise was fairly uneventful.
More tomorrow!
Photo 1: The entrance to our ship. It was pretty cool and I would have taken Gladys’s photo but she was packed in my cousin’s suitcase.
When we first entered there was music playing. The first song played full through was…Blurred Lines (why couldn’t it be Word Crimes?) So the first five minutes were ruined by that sexist piece of sh*t but we quickly found sanctuary in the buffet room.
Photo 2: My lunch on Day One of the cruise.
Not very exciting.
Photo 3:
Sam’s lunch.
Sam’s Comment: It was like a regular cheese burger, nothing wrong with it. It was nice and big. The fries were good.
Photo 4: Sam and I both ate a lot of desert on the cruise and ice cream was undoubtedly our favorite.
So cold, so tasty…
Photo 5: Chocolate cake.Sam and I split a piece and I have to say I was not a fan. Everything was too dry. Including the icing! It was horrible!
As you can tell, day one on the cruise was fairly uneventful.
More tomorrow!
Photo 1: The entrance to our ship. It was pretty cool and I would have taken Gladys’s photo but she was packed in my cousin’s suitcase.
When we first entered there was music playing. The first song played full through was…Blurred Lines (why couldn’t it be Word Crimes?) So the first five minutes were ruined by that sexist piece of sh*t but we quickly found sanctuary in the buffet room.
Photo 2: My lunch on Day One of the cruise.
Not very exciting.
Photo 3:
Sam’s lunch.
Sam’s Comment: It was like a regular cheese burger, nothing wrong with it. It was nice and big. The fries were good.
Photo 4: Sam and I both ate a lot of desert on the cruise and ice cream was undoubtedly our favorite.
So cold, so tasty…
Photo 5: Chocolate cake.Sam and I split a piece and I have to say I was not a fan. Everything was too dry. Including the icing! It was horrible!
As you can tell, day one on the cruise was fairly uneventful.
More tomorrow!
Photo 1: The entrance to our ship. It was pretty cool and I would have taken Gladys’s photo but she was packed in my cousin’s suitcase.
When we first entered there was music playing. The first song played full through was…Blurred Lines (why couldn’t it be Word Crimes?) So the first five minutes were ruined by that sexist piece of sh*t but we quickly found sanctuary in the buffet room.
Photo 2: My lunch on Day One of the cruise.
Not very exciting.
Photo 3:
Sam’s lunch.
Sam’s Comment: It was like a regular cheese burger, nothing wrong with it. It was nice and big. The fries were good.
Photo 4: Sam and I both ate a lot of desert on the cruise and ice cream was undoubtedly our favorite.
So cold, so tasty…
Photo 5: Chocolate cake.Sam and I split a piece and I have to say I was not a fan. Everything was too dry. Including the icing! It was horrible!
As you can tell, day one on the cruise was fairly uneventful.
More tomorrow!
Photo 1: The entrance to our ship. It was pretty cool and I would have taken Gladys’s photo but she was packed in my cousin’s suitcase.
When we first entered there was music playing. The first song played full through was…Blurred Lines (why couldn’t it be Word Crimes?) So the first five minutes were ruined by that sexist piece of sh*t but we quickly found sanctuary in the buffet room.
Photo 2: My lunch on Day One of the cruise.
Not very exciting.
Photo 3:
Sam’s lunch.
Sam’s Comment: It was like a regular cheese burger, nothing wrong with it. It was nice and big. The fries were good.
Photo 4: Sam and I both ate a lot of desert on the cruise and ice cream was undoubtedly our favorite.
So cold, so tasty…
Photo 5: Chocolate cake.Sam and I split a piece and I have to say I was not a fan. Everything was too dry. Including the icing! It was horrible!
As you can tell, day one on the cruise was fairly uneventful.
More tomorrow!

Photo 1: The entrance to our ship. It was pretty cool and I would have taken Gladys’s photo but she was packed in my cousin’s suitcase.

When we first entered there was music playing. The first song played full through was…Blurred Lines (why couldn’t it be Word Crimes?) So the first five minutes were ruined by that sexist piece of sh*t but we quickly found sanctuary in the buffet room.

Photo 2: My lunch on Day One of the cruise.

Not very exciting.

Photo 3:

Sam’s lunch.

Sam’s Comment: It was like a regular cheese burger, nothing wrong with it. It was nice and big. The fries were good.

Photo 4: Sam and I both ate a lot of desert on the cruise and ice cream was undoubtedly our favorite.

So cold, so tasty…

Photo 5: Chocolate cake.Sam and I split a piece and I have to say I was not a fan. Everything was too dry. Including the icing! It was horrible!

As you can tell, day one on the cruise was fairly uneventful.

More tomorrow!

http://fandomsandfeminism.tumblr.com/post/93211078999/stardust-rain-isanah-also-having-spoken

stardust-rain:

isanah:

also, having spoken with both parents about the shitshow that is Lucy, we are all in full agreement that Luc Besson and the writers did absolutely zero research on Taiwan and that the movie is not worth our time or money.

like dad told me: they didn’t realize…

I knew it was racist but not that racist.